Academia in the time of Covid-19: Our chance to develop an ethics of care

“In writing this opinion article we hope to encourage thinking about how academics may transform our work ethos now and in the future. This disruptive time can become an opportunity to foster a culture of care, refocus on what is most important, change expectations about the meaning of quality teaching and research, and in doing so make academic practice more respectful and sustainable.”

Decolonising Sleep: Or the reparative power of rest as a radical act to restore rhythmic cycles

‘The Dark Mountain Project’ online series ‘Becoming Human’ explores the physical, psychological and experiential aspects of our current predicament and how we might realign our bodies and minds with the living systems. Uma Dinsmore-Tuli makes a case for the reclamation of sleep in an insomniac culture.

Notes from a fractal encyclopædist on the interdependence of sleep and waking, delivered at a time when the only radical act remaining is to rest. Being declarations of freedom, independence and interdependence at the ragged edges of awareness, from a well-dreamt biographer of the power of sleep herself …

 

Netflix’s biggest competition is sleep

– CEO Reed Hastings (Independent, 19th April 2017)

 

There are colonies of wakefulness
upon the land of sleep.

Mining treasures from the caves of dream,

and clearing forests of rest

from hillsides of slumber.

 

These colonies of wakefulness are

Stealing from this land.

 

Anxiety and sleeplessness

Are stealing from this land

that used to be

A wild and pathless place to rest,

A secret forest of repair,

A private lake of restoration,

A hidden place of refuge to restore

within the wild diversity

of restful sleep and dream…

 

[You can find the full text by following the link to the content]

First North-South Conference on Degrowth-Descrecimiento, México City 2018 – Mujeres en Movimiento en la perspectiva ecofeminista: descrecimiento y economía solidaria en Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil

El diálogo entre descrecimiento y economía solidaria revela una potencialidad creativa de cambios a nivel local y regional, actuando en la microeconomía por la vía del ecofeminismo. Tal experiencia señala la imposibilidad de que exista libertad, si los medios de producción están enganchados a cualquier forma de explotación, colonización o subordinación del otro, incluidas ahí las mujeres.

First North-South Conference on Degrowth-Descrecimiento, México City 2018 – Managing degrowth: is this an oxymoron?

“Maybe it’s not by foresight and manipulation of a means of organizing, to institutionalize substantive values that a convivial degrowth society may be nourished.”

How to beat coronavirus capitalism?

An online teach-in with Naomi Klein, Astra Taylor, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, with a musical performance by Lia Rose.

The current crisis is laying bare the extreme injustices and inequalities of our economic and social system. We are in a battle of visions for how we’re going to respond to this crisis. We will either be catapulted backward to an even more brutal winner-takes-all system — or this will be a wake-up call. Ideas that were dismissed as too radical just a week ago are starting to seem like the only reasonable path to get out of this crisis and prevent future ones. We need to use every tool that we have that allows us to hear each other’s voices, to read each other’s words, to see each other’s faces, even if it’s just on screens, to stay organized and stay connected. We have to create spaces where we’re able to deliberate and strategize about what it means to protect our neighbors, our rights, and our planet. We have to have the confidence to say this is the moment when we change everything.

Environmental justice, degrowth and post-capitalist futures

Struggles for Environmental Justice, more widespread in the global South, are often framed as traditional societies defending “old ways of life”; while degrowth, a relatively new movement in the global North is seen as striving for a “new ways of life.” I argue that both assert or aspire for other ways of being and belonging to the world and open possibilities for post-capitalist futures. In this Commentary, I focus on ontological continuities between the two movements and the grounds for alliance building. I argue that EJ and degrowth movements need to not only learn from each other, but think with the actual practices on the ground and the epistemologies of the South to foster pluriversal world-making practices. Moreover, dialogues and alliance between the two movements can help to reconceptualize work and care in a post-production, post-growth world.

Ecological Economics, Vol. 163, September 2019, pp. 138-142

Keeping multiple antennae up: Coevolutionary foundations for methodological pluralism

Methodological pluralism has been a tenet of ecological economics since the journal’s inauguration. Pluralism has fostered collaboration and forged new insights across disciplines. However, to counter the hegemonic voice of mainstream economics and inspire action on climate change and inequality, ecological economics requires coherence to produce meaningful knowledge from diverse research findings. This has to be done in a world that is increasingly complex and rapidly changing. In this article, we argue that ecological economists should keep multiple antennae up to foresee and respond to the uncertainties of rapid change. Methodological pluralism facilitates diversity of thought, which scholars require in times of rapid change. Responding to previous critiques that methodological pluralism lacks philosophical foundation, we offer tentative conceptual and historical foundations. We ground our understanding of reality and how we partially know that reality in coevolutionary thinking. We illustrate how economistic beliefs (Economism), economic knowledge (episteme), and social-economic reality coevolve together with nature to produce the current era–the Econocene. Our historical tale of the Econocene illuminates how the economic-centric beliefs guiding public and academic knowledge reproduce unsustainable and inequitable outcomes. Ecological economists, we argue, should support guiding beliefs centered on the biosphere, equity, and care while practicing a structured pluralism.

Ecological Economics, Volume 165, November 2019, pp.

Environmental justice, degrowth and post-capitalist futures

Abstract: Struggles for Environmental Justice, more widespread in the global South, are often framed as traditional societies defending “old ways of life”; while degrowth, a relatively new movement in the global North is seen as striving for a “new ways of life.” I argue that both assert or aspire for other ways of being and belonging to the world and open possibilities for post-capitalist futures. In this Commentary, I focus on ontological continuities between the two movements and the grounds for alliance building. I argue that EJ and degrowth movements need to not only learn from each other, but think with the actual practices on the ground and the epistemologies of the South to foster pluriversal world-making practices. Moreover, dialogues and alliance between the two movements can help to reconceptualize work and care in a post-production, post-growth world.

Ecological Economics, Volume 163, September 2019, pp. 138-142

The Monetized Economy Versus Care and the Environment: Degrowth Perspectives On Reconciling an Antagonism

Abstract: This paper addresses the question of how the current growth paradigm perpetuates existing gender and environmental injustices and investigates whether these can be mitigated through a degrowth work-sharing proposal. It uses an adapted framework of the “ICE model” to illustrate how ecological processes and caring activities are structurally devalued by the monetized economy in a growth paradigm. On the one hand, this paradigm perpetuates gender injustices by reinforcing dualisms and devaluing care. On the other hand, environmental injustices are perpetuated since “green growth” does not succeed in dematerializing production processes. In its critique of the growth imperative, degrowth not only promotes the alleviation of environmental injustices but also calls for a recentering of society around care. This paper concludes that, if designed in a gender-sensitive way, a degrowth work-sharing proposal as part of a broader value transformation has the potential to address both gender and environmental injustices.

The Monetized Economy Versus Care and the Environment: Degrowth Perspectives On Reconciling an Antagonism

ABSTRACT: This paper addresses the question of how the current growth paradigm perpetuates existing gender and environmental injustices and investigates whether these can be mitigated through a degrowth work-sharing proposal. It uses an adapted framework of the “ICE model” to illustrate how ecological processes and caring activities are structurally devalued by the monetized economy in a growth paradigm. On the one hand, this paradigm perpetuates gender injustices by reinforcing dualisms and devaluing care. On the other hand, environmental injustices are perpetuated since “green growth” does not succeed in dematerializing production processes. In its critique of the growth imperative, degrowth not only promotes the alleviation of environmental injustices but also calls for a recentering of society around care. This paper concludes that, if designed in a gender-sensitive way, a degrowth work-sharing proposal as part of a broader value transformation has the potential to address both gender and environmental injustices.

Pages 1-24

THUR_16:30h // WORK Out of the Box!

Event “Work out of the box!” at the Degrowth Week, organized by the green european foundation. Part of the 6th International Degrowth Conference for Ecological Sustainability and Social Equity in Budapest in 2016.

Event is about sustainable work for all in a post-growth society.

What means working beyond the job?
What do we value as work?
How do we value it?

Degrowth 2016 – English youtube channel

Wir produzieren Zeitwohlstand

Herausgeber_innen: „Zeit ist Geld.“ Aber am Arbeitsmarkt ist Zeit
eine flüchtige Währung. Unter steigendem Rationalisierungs- und Wettbewerbsdruck fällt ihr Kurs zusehends. Und wir alle, die wir noch die letzten Zeitreserven einsetzen, tragen dazu bei. Dass es auch anders geht, zeigen uns Zeitpioniere und Postwachstumsunternehmen.

Where would gender relations stand in a Degrowth economy?

Abstract: The aim of this research paper is to analyse what the potential impacts of degrowth – or planned economic contraction – may be on women and the objective of reaching a state of gender equality. Starting with a short critical feminist overview of capitalism this paper will then follow on into a discussion regarding whether degrowth may emancipate women from the limitations imposed by the current economic model and generate new forms of access, participation and representation. In addition, degrowth will be placed under critical scrutiny as to whether current forms of gender inequality under the capitalist system will be exacerbated under degrowth and lead to further gendered marginalisation. Furthermore, cultural and social norms will be discussed in regards to what opportunities there are to revolutionise gender relations in terms of how those relations play out within work places, public spaces and domestic roles.
In critiquing the issues described above this paper will pay particular attention to reproductive work or care work including child rearing, cleaning, cooking, and other domestic chores. Women are currently charged with the bulk of social reproduction and the expansion of unpaid labour under a degrowth economy places important implications. In addition, women’s access to public domains has been ascribed restrictive cultural and social norms which also raises significant concerns regarding degrowth and its reconceptualization of public places. Furthermore, questions regarding women’s opportunities and how they are perceived in relation to domestic violence, GDP and its failure to assess levels of equality, and job opportunities and the wage gap.
Lastly, the role of ecofeminism has been significant within current literature regarding gender and degrowth economics. I will argue that ecofeminism displays a number of issues regarding the relationship between men and women and their gendered relationship to the environment. I will propose that if degrowth is to be a successful vehicle in reaching a state of gender equality the debate needs to go beyond arguments stipulated by ecofeminism and incorporate broader and more nuanced approaches towards the relations between men and women.

Care Revolution

Dies ist ein Beitrag zum Projekt Degrowth in Bewegung(en), in dem es um das Netzwerk Care Revolution geht.

Info zum Projekt Degrowth in Bewegung(en):
Degrowth ist nicht nur ein neues Label für eine Diskussion über Alternativen oder eine akademische Debatte, sondern auch eine im Entstehen begriffene soziale Bewegung. Trotz vieler Überschneidungen mit anderen sozialen Bewegungen gibt es sowohl bei diesen als auch in Degrowth-Kreisen noch viel Unkenntnis über die jeweils anderen. Hier bietet sich viel Raum für gegenseitiges Lernen.

Wie steht Degrowth im Verhältnis zu anderen sozialen Bewegungen? Was kann die Degrowth-Bewegung von diesen lernen? Und was können andere soziale Bewegungen wiederum voneinander sowie von Degrowth-Ideen und -Praktiken lernen? Welche gegenseitigen Anregungen aber auch welche Spannungen gibt es? Und wo könnten Bündnisse möglich sein?

Diesen Fragen gehen Vertreter_innen aus 32 sozialen Bewegungen, alternativökonomischen Strömungen und Initiativen in Essays nach. Die Texte sind zusammen mit Bildern sowie Audio- und Videobeiträgen auf dem Degrowth-Webportal veröffentlicht.

> Link zum Projekt mit allen Texten
> Link zum Artikel mit Bildern
> English version of the text “Care Revolution – Fighting for care work resources”

Freedom, awareness and desire in fifteen dialogues with childfree women

Introduction: We have been engaged in a research and published a book on the subject “Why are we childless?” A book to answer to the question so many times posed to us: Why you didn’t become a mother? And, with more astonishment: Why you never had that desire?
What’s a childless woman? Is she sort of a modern which? A woman hating kids? A virago devoted to the career? A selfish hedonist avoiding responsibilities? Be women childless seems to be one of the last taboos in our “liquid society”. The social pressure put on maternity is still high and is still heavy the prejudice against childless women.
However, how it is well-known, the statistical average in Italy is the lower in the world: 1,35 children per woman according to the Istat surveying made in 2008. It means that the statistical average in our country – as Marina Piazza remarks – is near to the real average: not many women have less than a child and not many have more than one.

Contribution to the 3rd International Degrowth Conference for Ecological Sustainability and Social Equity in Venice in 2012.