Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Collaborative housing in Catalonia: obstacles and strategies

Presentation [part of the standard session “Community, Housing, Care“]

Collaborative housing (cooperative and co housing) allows for efficient use of resources, solidarity and non-speculative urbanism. This degrowth model is expanding in Catalonia, through partnerships between government and civil society, but concrete implementation faces a series of obstacles.

Presenters: Mateus Lira M Machado (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

Language: English

Technical details: Standard F_Mateus Lira M Machado_Collaborative housing in Catalonia – obstacles and strategies.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 35.5MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Exploring Equitable Degrowth in Circular Community Development in Health and Care

Presentation [part of the standard session “Community, Housing, Care“]

Underserved and historically marginalized populations have been disproportionately afflicted by financial and climate related disasters. In face of the immediate climate crisis, many existing systems are being disrupted, thus adversely impacting the livelihood, health and wellbeing of underserved populations. In planning for better community health outcomes, we examine a new paradigm of coupling of healthcare with local green economic development. Modeling after ecovillage development and circular economy principles, we explore the potential of deploying circular communities, where residents produce what they consume to achieve resilience through self-sufficiency.

Presenters: Larissa Lai (University College London)

Language: English

Technical details: Standard F_Larissa Lai_Exploring Equitable Degrowth in Circular Community Development in Health and Care.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 81.4MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Materialising degrowth in local urban planning policies

Presentation [part of the standard session “Community, Housing, Care“]

This paper focuses on the intersection between degrowth and urban planning, and contributes to a deeper understanding and a sharper concretisation of how a strong sustainability concept such as degrowth can be taken into planning practice for long term sustainability.

Presenters: Carlos Ruiz-Alejos, Vincent Prats

Language: English

Technical details: Standard F_CARLOS_RUIZ-ALEJOS_Materialising degrowth in local urban planning policies.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 19.1MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Community, Housing, Care

Standard session (discussion following 4 presentations)

  1. Materialising degrowth in local urban planning policies – video
    This paper focuses on the intersection between degrowth and urban planning, and contributes to a deeper understanding and a sharper concretisation of how a strong sustainability concept such as degrowth can be taken into planning practice for long term sustainability.
    Presenters: Carlos Ruiz-Alejos, Vincent Prats
  2. Exploring Equitable Degrowth in Circular Community Development in Health and Care – video
    Underserved and historically marginalized populations have been disproportionately afflicted by financial and climate related disasters. In face of the immediate climate crisis, many existing systems are being disrupted, thus adversely impacting the livelihood, health and wellbeing of underserved populations. In planning for better community health outcomes, we examine a new paradigm of coupling of healthcare with local green economic development. Modeling after ecovillage development and circular economy principles, we explore the potential of deploying circular communities, where residents produce what they consume to achieve resilience through self-sufficiency.
    Presenters: Larissa Lai (University College London)
  3. Future’s Strategists: How Sustainability unfortunately did not intervene at Stuttgart Stöckach
    The presentation will showcase subsolar*s failed competition entry „Zukunfts Strateginnen“ for a transforming neighbourhood in Stuttgart as a case example and starting point to discuss obstacles, but also potentials and possible strategies to successfully “degrow” existing cities.
    Presenters: Saskia Hebert (subsolar* architektur & stadtforschung, Berlin)
  4. Collaborative housing in Catalonia: obstacles and strategies – video
    Collaborative housing (cooperative and co housing) allows for efficient use of resources, solidarity and non-speculative urbanism. This degrowth model is expanding in Catalonia, through partnerships between government and civil society, but concrete implementation faces a series of obstacles.
    Presenters: Mateus Lira M Machado (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) Language: English

Language: English

Technical details: Standard F_discussion.mkv, MKV file, 38.7MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Relations of Care: ethics and food production in Europe

Presentation [part of the standard session “Territories, Resources and Care Work Feminist Perspectives on Transformation“]

The Corona crisis has unprecedentedly highlighted the topic of this session: care work got visibility, its systemic relevance gained public recognition as never before. The appalling shortage of health care workers and the deficiencies in public health systems due to restructuring towards profit orientation and cost saving measures in the context of privatisation and globalisation became obvious. These systemic flaws aggravated the ongoing crisis of social reproduction towards a crisis of survival of societies. The pandemic also challenges the prevailing relation of human domination over nature and over bodies in the context of a growth-obsessed economy. The virus exposes the vulnerability of bodies and societies. It points at the destruction of ecosystems and of species due to the rapid expansion of industrial monocultures in agriculture, the encroachment of land, forest and water bodies. Thus, it shows the need to recognise the obstinacy of nature and to organise everyday life as a bio- and eco-social, and as a collective process saying farewell to the fiction of total control of nature. Therefore the crisis nurtures demands for a caring economy based on commons and oriented towards a good life for everybody. In everyday life people experienced that solidarity is an absolute necessity to cope with crisis situations. On the backdrop of a concept of feminist political economy and ecology which places the logic of care towards humans and nature at the centre of transformative strategies women resist a violent extractivist development model and a patriarchal-capitalist model of competition and individual utility maximisation. The session deals with different situations of violence: control over bodies and territories, and dispossession of land, livelihoods, resources and diversity. The focus is on everyday practices and politics of (re)production of environments, and of reclaiming and transforming spaces, territories and narratives vis-à-vis resource extractivism, large dam construction and industrialisation of food. In these critical situations and in critical places, the logic of caring and care work towards humans and nature link material und discursive production and reproduction while co-producing genders, natures and bodies. As Wendy Harcourt has highlighted, place-based everyday politics are about resistance but also about reinvention of practices, opportunities and commons as we move towards emancipatory and transformative politics. For these politics and strategies, growth in terms of ever increasing GDP is not the goal. The session will look at care work in our social-nature entanglements that promote social and gender justice, equality and alternative forms of knowing and acting.

Presenters: Wendy Harcourt (ISS, Den Hague), Anna Katharina Voss (ISS), Rosa de Nooijer (ISS)

Language: English

Technical details: WENDY_HARCOURT_SP K_NEW.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 279MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – WoMin – African women unite against destructive resource extraction

Presentation [part of the standard session “Territories, Resources and Care Work Feminist Perspectives on Transformation“]

The Corona crisis has unprecedentedly highlighted the topic of this session: care work got visibility, its systemic relevance gained public recognition as never before. The appalling shortage of health care workers and the deficiencies in public health systems due to restructuring towards profit orientation and cost saving measures in the context of privatisation and globalisation became obvious. These systemic flaws aggravated the ongoing crisis of social reproduction towards a crisis of survival of societies. The pandemic also challenges the prevailing relation of human domination over nature and over bodies in the context of a growth-obsessed economy. The virus exposes the vulnerability of bodies and societies. It points at the destruction of ecosystems and of species due to the rapid expansion of industrial monocultures in agriculture, the encroachment of land, forest and water bodies. Thus, it shows the need to recognise the obstinacy of nature and to organise everyday life as a bio- and eco-social, and as a collective process saying farewell to the fiction of total control of nature. Therefore the crisis nurtures demands for a caring economy based on commons and oriented towards a good life for everybody. In everyday life people experienced that solidarity is an absolute necessity to cope with crisis situations. On the backdrop of a concept of feminist political economy and ecology which places the logic of care towards humans and nature at the centre of transformative strategies women resist a violent extractivist development model and a patriarchal-capitalist model of competition and individual utility maximisation. The session deals with different situations of violence: control over bodies and territories, and dispossession of land, livelihoods, resources and diversity. The focus is on everyday practices and politics of (re)production of environments, and of reclaiming and transforming spaces, territories and narratives vis-à-vis resource extractivism, large dam construction and industrialisation of food. In these critical situations and in critical places, the logic of caring and care work towards humans and nature link material und discursive production and reproduction while co-producing genders, natures and bodies. As Wendy Harcourt has highlighted, place-based everyday politics are about resistance but also about reinvention of practices, opportunities and commons as we move towards emancipatory and transformative politics. For these politics and strategies, growth in terms of ever increasing GDP is not the goal. The session will look at care work in our social-nature entanglements that promote social and gender justice, equality and alternative forms of knowing and acting.

Presenter: Samantha Hargreaves

Language: English

Technical details: SP K_Samantha Hargreaves.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 126MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Beyond the Dam – Feminist perspectives on the social-environmental conflicts around the hydropower plant São Luis do Tapajós: shifting narratives

Presentation [part of the standard session “Territories, Resources and Care Work Feminist Perspectives on Transformation“]

The Corona crisis has unprecedentedly highlighted the topic of this session: care work got visibility, its systemic relevance gained public recognition as never before. The appalling shortage of health care workers and the deficiencies in public health systems due to restructuring towards profit orientation and cost saving measures in the context of privatisation and globalisation became obvious. These systemic flaws aggravated the ongoing crisis of social reproduction towards a crisis of survival of societies. The pandemic also challenges the prevailing relation of human domination over nature and over bodies in the context of a growth-obsessed economy. The virus exposes the vulnerability of bodies and societies. It points at the destruction of ecosystems and of species due to the rapid expansion of industrial monocultures in agriculture, the encroachment of land, forest and water bodies. Thus, it shows the need to recognise the obstinacy of nature and to organise everyday life as a bio- and eco-social, and as a collective process saying farewell to the fiction of total control of nature. Therefore the crisis nurtures demands for a caring economy based on commons and oriented towards a good life for everybody. In everyday life people experienced that solidarity is an absolute necessity to cope with crisis situations. On the backdrop of a concept of feminist political economy and ecology which places the logic of care towards humans and nature at the centre of transformative strategies women resist a violent extractivist development model and a patriarchal-capitalist model of competition and individual utility maximisation. The session deals with different situations of violence: control over bodies and territories, and dispossession of land, livelihoods, resources and diversity. The focus is on everyday practices and politics of (re)production of environments, and of reclaiming and transforming spaces, territories and narratives vis-à-vis resource extractivism, large dam construction and industrialisation of food. In these critical situations and in critical places, the logic of caring and care work towards humans and nature link material und discursive production and reproduction while co-producing genders, natures and bodies. As Wendy Harcourt has highlighted, place-based everyday politics are about resistance but also about reinvention of practices, opportunities and commons as we move towards emancipatory and transformative politics. For these politics and strategies, growth in terms of ever increasing GDP is not the goal. The session will look at care work in our social-nature entanglements that promote social and gender justice, equality and alternative forms of knowing and acting.

Presenters: Camila Nobrega

Language: English

Technical details: SP K_Camila Nobrega.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 68.2MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Degrowth Vienna 2020 – Territories, Resources and Care Work Feminist Perspectives on Transformation

Special session (discussion following 3 presentations)

The Corona crisis has unprecedentedly highlighted the topic of this session: care work got visibility, its systemic relevance gained public recognition as never before. The appalling shortage of health care workers and the deficiencies in public health systems due to restructuring towards profit orientation and cost saving measures in the context of privatisation and globalisation became obvious. These systemic flaws aggravated the ongoing crisis of social reproduction towards a crisis of survival of societies. The pandemic also challenges the prevailing relation of human domination over nature and over bodies in the context of a growth-obsessed economy. The virus exposes the vulnerability of bodies and societies. It points at the destruction of ecosystems and of species due to the rapid expansion of industrial monocultures in agriculture, the encroachment of land, forest and water bodies. Thus, it shows the need to recognise the obstinacy of nature and to organise everyday life as a bio- and eco-social, and as a collective process saying farewell to the fiction of total control of nature. Therefore the crisis nurtures demands for a caring economy based on commons and oriented towards a good life for everybody. In everyday life people experienced that solidarity is an absolute necessity to cope with crisis situations. On the backdrop of a concept of feminist political economy and ecology which places the logic of care towards humans and nature at the centre of transformative strategies women resist a violent extractivist development model and a patriarchal-capitalist model of competition and individual utility maximisation. The session deals with different situations of violence: control over bodies and territories, and dispossession of land, livelihoods, resources and diversity. The focus is on everyday practices and politics of (re)production of environments, and of reclaiming and transforming spaces, territories and narratives vis-à-vis resource extractivism, large dam construction and industrialisation of food. In these critical situations and in critical places, the logic of caring and care work towards humans and nature link material und discursive production and reproduction while co-producing genders, natures and bodies. As Wendy Harcourt has highlighted, place-based everyday politics are about resistance but also about reinvention of practices, opportunities and commons as we move towards emancipatory and transformative politics. For these politics and strategies, growth in terms of ever increasing GDP is not the goal. The session will look at care work in our social-nature entanglements that promote social and gender justice, equality and alternative forms of knowing and acting.

Presenters: Christa Wichterich (freelance, UniBonn), Samantha Hargreaves (WoMin), Camila Nobrega (FU Berlin), Wendy Harcourt (ISS, Den Hague), Anna Katharina Voss (ISS), Rosa de Nooijer (ISS)

Presentations:

Camila Nobrega (FU Berlin) – video

Samantha Hargreaves (WoMin) – video

Wendy Harcourt (ISS, Den Hague), Anna Katharina Voss (ISS), Rosa de Nooijer (ISS) – video

Language: English

Technical details: SP K_discussion.mp4, MPEG-4 video, 39.6MB

This is a link to a torrent video file. By clicking on ‘external content’ you will be opening a magnet link that will allow you to download the corresponding video with a torrent client. To learn more about downloading torrents see here.

Academia in the time of Covid-19: Our chance to develop an ethics of care

“In writing this opinion article we hope to encourage thinking about how academics may transform our work ethos now and in the future. This disruptive time can become an opportunity to foster a culture of care, refocus on what is most important, change expectations about the meaning of quality teaching and research, and in doing so make academic practice more respectful and sustainable.”

Decolonising Sleep: Or the reparative power of rest as a radical act to restore rhythmic cycles

‘The Dark Mountain Project’ online series ‘Becoming Human’ explores the physical, psychological and experiential aspects of our current predicament and how we might realign our bodies and minds with the living systems. Uma Dinsmore-Tuli makes a case for the reclamation of sleep in an insomniac culture.

Notes from a fractal encyclopædist on the interdependence of sleep and waking, delivered at a time when the only radical act remaining is to rest. Being declarations of freedom, independence and interdependence at the ragged edges of awareness, from a well-dreamt biographer of the power of sleep herself …

 

Netflix’s biggest competition is sleep

– CEO Reed Hastings (Independent, 19th April 2017)

 

There are colonies of wakefulness
upon the land of sleep.

Mining treasures from the caves of dream,

and clearing forests of rest

from hillsides of slumber.

 

These colonies of wakefulness are

Stealing from this land.

 

Anxiety and sleeplessness

Are stealing from this land

that used to be

A wild and pathless place to rest,

A secret forest of repair,

A private lake of restoration,

A hidden place of refuge to restore

within the wild diversity

of restful sleep and dream…

 

[You can find the full text by following the link to the content]

First North-South Conference on Degrowth-Descrecimiento, México City 2018 – Mujeres en Movimiento en la perspectiva ecofeminista: descrecimiento y economía solidaria en Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil

El diálogo entre descrecimiento y economía solidaria revela una potencialidad creativa de cambios a nivel local y regional, actuando en la microeconomía por la vía del ecofeminismo. Tal experiencia señala la imposibilidad de que exista libertad, si los medios de producción están enganchados a cualquier forma de explotación, colonización o subordinación del otro, incluidas ahí las mujeres.

First North-South Conference on Degrowth-Descrecimiento, México City 2018 – Managing degrowth: is this an oxymoron?

“Maybe it’s not by foresight and manipulation of a means of organizing, to institutionalize substantive values that a convivial degrowth society may be nourished.”

How to beat coronavirus capitalism?

An online teach-in with Naomi Klein, Astra Taylor, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, with a musical performance by Lia Rose.

The current crisis is laying bare the extreme injustices and inequalities of our economic and social system. We are in a battle of visions for how we’re going to respond to this crisis. We will either be catapulted backward to an even more brutal winner-takes-all system — or this will be a wake-up call. Ideas that were dismissed as too radical just a week ago are starting to seem like the only reasonable path to get out of this crisis and prevent future ones. We need to use every tool that we have that allows us to hear each other’s voices, to read each other’s words, to see each other’s faces, even if it’s just on screens, to stay organized and stay connected. We have to create spaces where we’re able to deliberate and strategize about what it means to protect our neighbors, our rights, and our planet. We have to have the confidence to say this is the moment when we change everything.

Environmental justice, degrowth and post-capitalist futures

Struggles for Environmental Justice, more widespread in the global South, are often framed as traditional societies defending “old ways of life”; while degrowth, a relatively new movement in the global North is seen as striving for a “new ways of life.” I argue that both assert or aspire for other ways of being and belonging to the world and open possibilities for post-capitalist futures. In this Commentary, I focus on ontological continuities between the two movements and the grounds for alliance building. I argue that EJ and degrowth movements need to not only learn from each other, but think with the actual practices on the ground and the epistemologies of the South to foster pluriversal world-making practices. Moreover, dialogues and alliance between the two movements can help to reconceptualize work and care in a post-production, post-growth world.

Ecological Economics, Vol. 163, September 2019, pp. 138-142

Keeping multiple antennae up: Coevolutionary foundations for methodological pluralism

Methodological pluralism has been a tenet of ecological economics since the journal’s inauguration. Pluralism has fostered collaboration and forged new insights across disciplines. However, to counter the hegemonic voice of mainstream economics and inspire action on climate change and inequality, ecological economics requires coherence to produce meaningful knowledge from diverse research findings. This has to be done in a world that is increasingly complex and rapidly changing. In this article, we argue that ecological economists should keep multiple antennae up to foresee and respond to the uncertainties of rapid change. Methodological pluralism facilitates diversity of thought, which scholars require in times of rapid change. Responding to previous critiques that methodological pluralism lacks philosophical foundation, we offer tentative conceptual and historical foundations. We ground our understanding of reality and how we partially know that reality in coevolutionary thinking. We illustrate how economistic beliefs (Economism), economic knowledge (episteme), and social-economic reality coevolve together with nature to produce the current era–the Econocene. Our historical tale of the Econocene illuminates how the economic-centric beliefs guiding public and academic knowledge reproduce unsustainable and inequitable outcomes. Ecological economists, we argue, should support guiding beliefs centered on the biosphere, equity, and care while practicing a structured pluralism.

Ecological Economics, Volume 165, November 2019, pp.